Cédric Fischmeister

CNRS Research Engineer

Cédric Fischmeister

Email : cedric [dot] fischmeister [at] univ-rennes1 [dot] fr

Phone : +33 (0) 2 23 23 59 98

Office number : 021 - Build. 10 C

Education and professional experience

I received my PhD degree in 1998 from the University of Montpellier II working on the synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic materials under the supervision of Profs. Robert Corriu and Geneviève Cerveau. In 1998, I joined the group of Prof. Régis Réau in Rennes as an “ATER” to work on phosphole-containing conjugated molecules for light emitting materials. After spending 16 months as a post-doc research associate in the group of Prof. Andrew Holmes in the Melville Laboratory for polymer synthesis in Cambridge, UK working on the synthesis of PPVs for LEDs, I was appointed in 2001 as a CNRS research engineer in the group of Dr. Christian Bruneau and Prof. Pierre Dixneuf, and I obtained the “Habilitation à Diriger les Recherches” in 2008.

Researcher data

Research interests

 

Bandeau CF

 

We are working at the interfaces of Organometallic Chemistry, Homogeneous Catalysis and Green and Sustainable Chemistry. The design and synthesis of catalysts and the implementation of catalytic processes for the transformation of renewables and for hydrogen storage are some of our main interests. In all our research projects, we pay great attention to the use of non-hazardous media as well as to processes allowing an easy and effective separation of the catalysts and metal residues.

 

  • Valorization of renewable compounds

- Levulinic acid

We are interested in the valorization of platform chemicals arising from carbohydrates. In particular, we have been investigating with success the reduction of levulinic acid into γ–valerolactone and the reductive amination of levulinic acid into various pyrrolidones including original and non-reported sterically hindered pyrrolidones.

 

LA valorization

For more information, see references 68-70, 77

 

- Unsaturated renewable compounds - Olefin Metathesis

Our team has been involved in the field of olefin metathesis for 20 years. Early work focused on the development of original ruthenium catalysts. More recently, our researches focused on the implementation of olefin metathesis in catalytic processes aimed at the transformation and valorization of renewables materials. We have been particularly interested in the transformation of FAMEs (Fatty Acid Methyl Esters) into compounds of industrial relevance. Terpenes are another familly of renewable compounds of interest in the Flavour and Fragrance domain. Several studies are ongoing in collaboration with Brazilian research teams. As part of our efforts toward the implementation of green processes, we are continuously exploring sequential transformations (one-pot, tandem, domino) with the aim to add value to simple molecules while minimizing the generation of wastes and improving the economic aspect of the targeted transformation.

- From ricinoleic acid (castor oil = ricin oil)

- Polymer precursors (see references 16,21-23, 27, 31, 36, 37, 46, 47, 55, 59, 62-64)

    

- Polymer precursors and fine chemicals (see reference 50)

Polymers and fine chemicals from methyl ricinoleate

- From terpenes

Olefin metathesis demonstrated its full interest and utility in catalysis with the transformation of terpenes. For instrance, we have transformed citronellol into another terpene derivative in a single step with isobutene produced as the unique co-product.42 This is a  an exemple clearly emphasizing the benefit of catalysis and homogeneous catalysis for green and sustainable processes considering the other routes available for the synthesis of this compound.

Terpene

 

The cross-metathesis of strained and sterically hindered terpenes is a challenging reaction. This transformation could be achieved by employing internal olefins whereas terminal olefins failed to deliver the desired product.81

 

- From 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoids

under construction

  • Hydrogen Storage and energy

Hydrogen will be one of the clean energy vectors for the future. We are interested in the safe chemical hydrogen storage including the so-called LOHC, Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers. In particular, we are focusing on N-heterocycles and formic acid as hydrogen reservoirs. An electron-enriched iridium catalyst performed the reversible hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of quinoline in water and the base-free dehydrogenation of neat formic acid.

Chemical Hydrogen Storage

For more information, see references 75, 78

 

Teaching

Green Chemistry: International Master in Catalysis, Molecules and Green Chemistry (CatGreenChem)

Homogeneous Catalysis: Master in Molecular Chemistry

Collaborations

  • Prof. M. Rabiller-Baudry, Dr. T. Renouard (University of Rennes 1)
  • Prof. M. Beller, Dr. K. Junge, Likat, Rostock, Germany
  • Prof. E. dos Santos, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
  • Prof. D. Mandelli, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo Andre, Brazil
  • Dr. A. Igau, LCC, Toulouse, France

Current members

  • Raphael Veron (PhD, ANR CatEngy),
  • Liwei Guo (PhD, China Scholarship Council),

Master students

  • Hana Tabikh,
  • Oscar Charpentier,

Former Students and Post-docs

Post-docs

  • Dr. Ana Luisa Lage,
  • Dr. Thalita Galhardo Soares,
  • Dr. Hélène Bonin,
  • Dr. Frédéric Hild,
  • Dr. Anzhelika Kabro,
  • Dr. Adel Keraani, 
  • Dr. Rim Makhoul,
  • Dr. Raluca Malacea,
  • Dr. Paul Vignon,
  • Dr. Feng Yu,

 

PhD students

  • Alexandre Damiani,  (PhD, CAPES-COFECUB, Santo André, Brazil)
  • Luciana Sarmento Fernances,  (PhD, CAPES-COFECUB, Santo André, Brazil)
  • Julien Hervochon,  (now Post-doc, Université de Rouen)
  • Gabriel Matos Vieira,
  • Wang Shengdong,  (Professor, Guangzhou Medical University, China)
  • Meriem Abderrezak Algérie Drapeau Pays - Images vectorielles gratuites sur Pixabay(now assistant professor, Algeria)
  • Percia Arockiam,  (now post-doc, Regensburg, Germany)
  • Johan Bidange,  (Solvay)
  • Hallouma Bilel,